How to collect enough rainwater

The rainy season is when the water supply is good, why should I harvest rainwater?

1) This is not always the case and becoming increasingly less so. The current demand for water is 320 Million Liters Per Day while the supply is only 120 Million Liters a Day in the Monsoon. In 2002 the demand was 140 Million Liters a Day; every day the water situation becomes worse for somebody even in the monsoon, tomorrow that person could be you. More than 15% of Kathmandu’s population purchases trucks of water year round, meaning they spend more than 30,000 rupees a year on water.

1) This is not always the case and becoming increasingly less so. The current demand for water is 320 Million Liters Per Day while the supply is only 120 Million Liters a Day in the Monsoon. In 2002 the demand was 140 Million Liters a Day; every day the water situation becomes worse for somebody even in the monsoon, tomorrow that person could be you. More than 15% of Kathmandu’s population purchases trucks of water year round, meaning they spend more than 30,000 rupees a year on water.

1) This is not always the case and becoming increasingly less so. The current demand for water is 320 Million Liters Per Day while the supply is only 120 Million Liters a Day in the Monsoon. In 2002 the demand was 140 Million Liters a Day; every day the water situation becomes worse for somebody even in the monsoon, tomorrow that person could be you. More than 15% of Kathmandu’s population purchases trucks of water year round, meaning they spend more than 30,000 rupees a year on water.

1) This is not always the case and becoming increasingly less so. The current demand for water is 320 Million Liters Per Day while the supply is only 120 Million Liters a Day in the Monsoon. In 2002 the demand was 140 Million Liters a Day; every day the water situation becomes worse for somebody even in the monsoon, tomorrow that person could be you. More than 15% of Kathmandu’s population purchases trucks of water year round, meaning they spend more than 30,000 rupees a year on water.

PROJECT

GroundwaterThe WASHREG ApproachEstablish systems of sanctions for non-adherence of operators to service norms and regulationsInitiate administrative infringement procedures against non-compliant drinking water service operators and impose adequate sanctionsManage non-compliance cases as a knowledge practice for future recallsPenalize actors for their non-compliance with environmental legislation and policiesEstablish mechanisms for receiving and dealing with citizen complaints related to water resources useDevelop inspection protocols for water abstraction and discharge points and receiving water bodiesRaise public awareness on the rational use of waterDevelop systematic approaches for routinely sharing water resources information with the publicEstablish and manage water resources abstraction and effluent discharge registersEstablish environmental protection zones, associated rules, and regulatory compliance proceduresDefine mechanisms for the approval of water abstraction rights and wastewater effluent discharge permitsSet standards for quality of effluent discharges arising from wastewater servicesImpose penalties on operators whose practices against free competition are not reversableImpose mandatory procurement measures or split operators’ assets when they benefit from a monopolyDetect abuses of monopoly by operators and concerted practices harmful for consumersAnalyse the existence of any anti-competitive advantages granted to operatorsPublicly disclose information related to competition policy or anticompetitive acts by operatorsOversee operators’ tendering and contracting processes, modifications, terminations, reconfigurations, and mergersEnsure healthy competition through equal treatment of all operators within the scope of public procurementRegulate and promote market competition, public and private, for drinking water and sanitation servicesApply sanctions under the terms set out in legislationAlert operators in case of non-compliance with tariff regulations and issue correcting instructionsMonitor economic and financial performance indicators at operator and national levelVerify the efficiency of operatorsCollect and validate operators’ financial and operational dataGather operators’ tariff revenues, costs, and consumer willingness and ability to payEstablish processes, rules, and responsibilities for systematic tariff adjustmentDefine criteria, rules and processes for tariff setting, tariff structure, approval, and service invoicingEstablish penalty systems for infringing contractual provisions regarding consumer protectionEstablish reward systems through benchmarking for operators with higher consumer satisfactionMediate and reconcile conflicts involving service operators and consumersReview and monitor existing contracts between service operators and consumersIdentify and investigate drinking water safety regulatory compliance failures and provide instructions for remediation measuresDevelop protocols for dealing with consumer water quality complaintsDevelop protocols for inspecting laboratories undertaking regulatory compliance analyses, in conjunction with respective accreditation bodiesDevelop inspection and audit protocols to ensure compliance with approved water and sanitation safety plansDevelop accessible communication channels to receive consumer complaintsSensitize and educate consumers about their rights and obligationsEstablish drinking water quality failure event management procedures and protocolsDevelop fact sheets on health implications of priority drinking water contaminantsPeriodically develop publicly available regulatory updates and water quality compliance reportsDevelop and maintain registers of authorized laboratories to perform water quality analysesDevelop procedures to collect information required to regulate drinking water quality and water and sanitation safety plansConduct regular households surveys or similar instruments to assess consumer satisfactionEstablish regulatory frameworks and guidelines for water and sanitation safety plansDevelop consumer chart guidelines that establish clear rights and dutiesEstablish water quality regulatory compliance monitoring and reporting protocolsDefine drinking water quality standardsEstablish systems of incentives and rewards for operators’ performance by regulatorsEstablish processes to validate the data provided by operatorsConduct regular audits to check service quality indicatorsAboutDevelop procedures to establish water consumer spaces at utility levelDefine and establish consumer protection policiesProduce and publish analytic reports to track progress on service qualityEstablish protocols for periodic data collection on service qualityEstablish policies and procedures for the provision of good quality servicesDefine service quality standards and indicators for operatorsProtected: SJWP ProjectsNepalRussia2022: Professor Emeritus Wilfried BrutsaertThe TeamLocal water managementHuman-Rights Based Approach in Water Supply and SanitationGender and women’s leadership in water supply and sanitationKnowledge Management Strategy on Democratic Economic Governance (DEG-KM)Sri LankaBangladeshIraqJordanTurkeyUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUzbekistanBelarusKyrgyzstanPalestineLessons and insightsTaking stock of achievementsEvery Drop MattersTowards Transcultural TransparencySub-Saharan Africa Water Integrity Capacity Building ProgrammeWater Integrity Capacity Building Programme in MENAWater Integrity ProgrammeProgrammesLatin America Capacity Building ProgrammeNational organizersSanitation governanceWater and sanitationIndigenous peopleHuman RightsIntegrityGenderWater and climateWater CooperationWater ResourcesWork areasWASH in SchoolsGlobal partnershipsProjectsAlumniPast newsletters1991: Professor David W. 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